Quotes

“. . . The idea of God is an absolutely necessary psychological function of an irrational nature, which has nothing whatever to do with the question of God’s existence. The human intellect can never answer this question, still less give any proof of God. Moreover such proof is superfluous, for the idea of an all-powerful divine Being is present everywhere, unconsciously if not consciously, because it is an archetype. There is in the psyche some superior power, and if it is not consciously a god, it is the “belly” at least, in St. Paul’s words. I therefore consider it wiser to acknowledge the idea of God consciously; for, if we do not, something else is made God, usually something quite inappropriate and stupid such as only an “enlightened” intellect could hatch forth. Our intellect has long known that we can form no proper idea of God, much less picture to ourselves in what manner he really exists, if at all. The existence of God is once and for all an unanswerable question. . .” Carl Jung, CW7, par.110

“And because we want and yet cannot think out what it is we really want, the . . .conflict is largely unconscious, and thence comes neurosis. Neurosis, therefore, is intimately bound up with the problem of our time and really represents an unsuccessful attempt on the part of the individual to solve the general problem in his own person. Neurosis is self-division.” Jung CW 7, §430

“We should not try to ‘get rid’ of a neurosis, but rather to experience what it means, what it has to teach, what its purpose is. We should even learn to be thankful for it, otherwise we pass it by and miss the opportunity of getting to know ourselves as we really are. A neurosis is truly removed only when it has removed the false attitude of the ego. We do not cure it – it cures us. A person is ill, but the illness is nature’s attempt to heal the person. From the illness itself we can learn so much for our recovery, and what the neurotic flings away as absolutely worthless contains the true gold we should never have found elsewhere.” (C.G. Jung, CW 10, p.179)

“The sight of evil kindles evil in the soul…. The victim is not the only sufferer; everybody in the vicinity of the crime, including the murderer, suffers with him. Something of the abysmal darkness of the world has broken in on us, poisoning the very air we breathe and befouling the water with the stale, nauseating taste of blood.” (Jung, 1945, After the catastrophe; CW 10, p.199)

“Madness is a special form of the spirit and clings to all teachings and philosophies, but even more to daily life, since life itself is full of craziness and at bottom utterly illogical. Man strives toward reason only so that he can make rules for himself. Life itself has no rules. That is its mystery and its unknown law. What you call knowledge is an attempt to impose something comprehensible on life.” (Jung, RB, Liber Secundus, 108)

“…is the outcome of a definite view of life endowing the occurrence, whether great or small, with a meaning to which a certain deeper value is given than to pure actuality” (Jung, CW 6, 1921, p. 604).

“So far as my experience goes, these four basic functions seem to me sufficient to express and represent the various modes of conscious orientation—these four basic functions are seldom or never uniformly differentiated and equally at our disposal. As a rule one or the other function occupies the foreground, while the rest remain undifferentiated in the background.” (CW 6, par. 900, 901)

“I cannot prove to you that God exists, but my work has proved empirically that the pattern of God exists in every man and that this pattern in the individual has at its disposal the greatest transforming energies of which life is capable.  Find this pattern in your own individual self and life is transformed.” (Jung, Letter to Lauerence van Der Post)

“The unconscious no sooner touches us than we are it – we become unconscious of ourselves. That is the age-old danger, instinctively known and feared by primitive man, who himself stands so very close to this pleroma. His consciousness is still uncertain, wobbling on its feet. It is still childish, having just emerged from the primal waters. A wave of the unconscious may easily roll over it, and then he forgets who he was and does things that are strange to him.” (Jung, 1951, p.25)

„Sotva se nás nevědomí jen dotkne, a už jsme jím – stáváme se nevědomi sebe sama. To je ono prastaré nebezpečí, instinktivně známé a obávané primitivním člověkem, který osamocen stojí tak blízko k Plérómatu. Jeho vědomí je dosud nejisté, sotva se drží na nohou. Je doposud dětinské, sotva se vynořilo z prapůvodních vodstev. Vlna nevědomí se přes něj může kdykoli převalit a on pak rázem zapomene, kým byl, a dělá prapodivné věci. Primitivové se právě proto bojí nezvladatelných emocí, neboť se pod jejich tíhou láme vědomí, čímž je dán průchod posedlosti. Veškeré úsilí člověka se tudíž vždy zaměřovalo na konsolidaci vědomí. V tom vězel smysl rituálu a dogmat; ony byly přehradami a hradbami, které měly za úkol zadržet nebezpečí nevědomí, nástrahy duše.”  (Jung 1951a, str. 25)

“Naturally, a doctor must be familiar with the so-called “methods.” But he must guard against falling into any specific, routine approach. In general one must guard against theoretical assumptions. … In my analyses they play no part. I am unsystematic very much by intention. We need a different language for every patient.” (Jung, 1963, p. 153)

“Thoroughly unprepared, we take the step into the afternoon of life. Worse still, we take this step with the false presupposition that our truths and our ideals will serve us as hitherto. But we cannot live the afternoon of life according to the program of life’s morning, for what was great in the morning will be little at evening and what in the morning was true, at evening will have become a lie.” (Stages of life, p. 111, C. G. Jung)

“Therefore anyone who wants to know the human psyche will learn next to nothing from experimental psychology. He would be better advised to abandon exact science, put away his scholar’s gown, bid farewell to his study, and wander with human heart through the world. There, in the horrors of prisons, lunatic asylums and hospitals, in drab suburban pubs, in brothels and gambling hells, … he would reap richer stores of knowledge…” (Jung, CW 7, par. 409)

“The psychological rule says that when an inner situation is not made conscious, it happens outside, as fate.  That is to say, when the individual remains undivided and does not become conscious of his inner opposite, the world must perforce act out the conflict and be torn into opposing halves.”
(Jung, in Aion, CW 9ii, § 126)

“One without a myth is like one uprooted, having no true link either with the past, or with the ancestral life which continues within him, or even yet within contemporary human society.”
(Jung, CW 5, pp. xxvi)

“Důvody k přijetí konspiračních teorií můžeme hledat v „zatemnění“ vědomí spíše osobními nevědomými obsahy, kdežto u fundamentalistických náboženských postojů se jedna o hlubinné archetypální energie, jež jsou výrazně odštěpeny od já. Nezpracovaný rasismus může vést k „teorii” rasové nadřazenosti, odmítané homosexuální sklony (tzv. closet homosexual) mohou vést k nenávistnému pronásledování gayů, strach z vlastních citů a ženských aspektů může vést k ponižování nebo pokořování žen, nevědomý komplex méněcennosti zase k „teorii” všemocných iluminátů, kteří ovládají planetu. U „temného náboženství“ se ale „já“ „skrývá” za kolektivní obraz boha, náboženská posedlost, theocalypsis (výraz pro jev, jež zahrnuje všechny formy excesívního, nezdravého náboženství, tedy fundamentalismu, fanatismu i sektářství) má proto hlubší kořeny, za identifikací stojí kolektivní hlubinné obsahy, proto je posedlost velice silná a možnost korekce velice malá.”

“Even a happy life cannot be without a measure of darkness, and the word happy would lose its meaning if it were not balanced by sadness. It is far better take things as they come along with patience and equanimity.” Jung

“The sight of evil kindles evil in the soul…. The victim is not the only sufferer; everybody in the vicinity of the crime, including the murderer, suffers with him. Something of the abysmal darkness of the world has broken in on us, poisoning the very air we breathe and befouling the water with the stale, nauseating taste of blood.”
Jung, 1945. After the Catastrophe. Coll. Works. 10. p. 199

“It is an outstanding peculiarity of unconscious impulses that, when deprived of energy by lack of conscious recognition, they take on a destructive character, and this happens as soon as they cease to be compensatory”
Psychological Types, par. 574, C. G. Jung

“Řádění Islámského státu, Boko Haram, aš-Šabáb ale i jiných, křesťanských, fundamentalistických skupin znova a znova otevírá otázku náboženského poblouznění; otázku, která pravidelně nabírá na intenzitě tím vice, čím vice těmto přívržencům hrabe. Projevy extrémního náboženství jsou patrně stará, jako náboženství samotné, výrazně se vsak zviditelnila na pozadí vzestupu sekulárního způsobu života a vzniku toho, čemu říkáme spiritualita neboli duchovnost. S tím jak pokračuje evoluce náboženského vědomí, otevírající cestu pro vice svobodomyslný pohled na Boha, je najednou vice viditelná i involuce tohoto procesu, charakteristická svou rigidnosti, dogmatičnosti, doslovnosti a jinými symptomy, které psychologové znají velice dobře, jelikož představují překážky, chcete-li obrany, jimiž si já (ego) bráni svou celistvost tváře v tvář změnám, jenž na něj zvnějšku i zvnitřku doléhají.” Vlado Solc, Temné náboženství, aneb, když z náboženství hrabe. Vice na psychologie.cz

“The development of Western philosophy during the last two centuries has succeeded in isolating the mind in its own sphere and in severing it from its primordial oneness with the universe. Man himself has ceased to be the microcosm and eidolon of the cosmos, and his “anima” is no longer the consubstantial scintilla, spark of the Anima Mundi, World Soul” (Carl Jung, CW 11, par 759)

“Until you make the unconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate.”
C.G. Jung

“All human control comes to an end when the individual is caught up in a mass movement. Then the archetypes begin to function, as happens also in the lives of individuals when they are confronted with situations that cannot be dealt with in any of the familiar ways.” (Jung 1936/1970: 189–190)

“No matter what the world thinks about religious experience, the one who has it possesses a great treasure, a thing that has become for him a source of life, meaning, and beauty, and that has given a new splendor to the world and to mankind.” C. G. Jung, Psychology and Religion, CW 11, par. 167

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.” Martin Luther King, Jr.

“The archetypes are, as it were, the hidden foundations of the conscious mind. Archetypes are systems of readiness for action, and at the same time images and emotions… They represent, on the one hand, a very strong instinctive conservatism, while on the other hand they are the most effective means conceivable of instinctive adaptation.”
C.G. Jung, CW 10, “Mind and Earth” (1927), para. 53

“No matter what the world thinks about religious experience, the one who has it possesses a great treasure, a thing that has become for him a source of life, meaning, and beauty, and that has given a new splendor to the world and to mankind.”
C. G. Jung, Psychology and Religion, CW 11, par. 167

“The archetypes are, as it were, the hidden foundations of the conscious mind. Archetypes are systems of readiness for action, and at the same time images and emotions… They represent, on the one hand, a very strong instinctive conservatism, while on the other hand they are the most effective means conceivable of instinctive adaptation. ”
C.G. Jung, CW 10, “Mind and Earth” (1927)

“All human control comes to an end when the individual is caught up in a mass movement. Then the archetypes begin to function, as happens also in the lives of individuals when they are confronted with situations that cannot be dealt with in any of the familiar ways.” (Jung 1936/1970: 189–190)

“The decisive question for man is: Is he related to something infinite or not?”
C. G. Jung, Memories Dreams, Reflections

“The first half of life is devoted to forming a healthy ego, the second half is going inward and letting go of it.”
C.G. Jung

“Individuation is thus naturally not only psychological, but also a religious process. They are organically intertwined. The “organic unity” of psychological and religious experiences, described by Dourly (1984), elevates, on one hand, an everyday being into a process of incarnation of the holy and on the other hand approximates the divine to the human doing away with its infinite remoteness and unattainability. Only if there is a “place” where a perceptual and experiential connection is possible is a pragmatic ground of Jungian inquiry justified.
Our intentions here are equally practical: to explore various psychological processes identified as specifically religious and to reveal possible influences on human well-being if such processes reach dangerous levels of intensity. Jung (1940) famously said, “Wherever [the] unconscious reigns, there is bondage and possession” (p. 84). The absence of consciousness and the absence of unconsciousness or their mutual domination over the each-other are always obstacles for achieving happiness. It is the fine and fragile balance of both which protects us from fanatic entrapment on one hand and a feeling of spiritual desertion on the other.” (From our upcoming book)

“The human psyche rose out of the world that she is a part of. Psyche is “in” the world the same way the world is “in” the psyche. What we conventionally call an objective world is to a lesser or greater degree part of the psyche. The objective and the subjective are only auxiliary terms while dealing with object-subject continuum. Psyche is basically immersed, in that world and is adapted to perceive it and to interact with it. We cannot know how would this “objective” world look like without the “subject.” Would there be a sound of branch falling from the tree if there was nobody in the forest? What (and how) we are able to touch, see and to hear is determined by the innate faculties of our senses. There are temperatures that we consider cold and hot, based on the functional principles of our bodies. For example humans cannot see electromagnetic wavelength outside of the spectrum of 390 – 700 nm., we cannot detect vibrations in our ears which are lower than 20 Hz and greater than 20 KHz and the like. We know they “exist” because of technological devices that extend our senses. The same is true about a priori categories of pure reason determining how we are able to think and what we are able to think. Categories of feeling and imagination (archetypes) allow us to experience the world very determined way as what we can feel and know about the “objective” world, therefore cannot go beyond the frame of those inner structures. Emotions and feelings being functions of experience “in” the objective world would have no bearing without the objective world and are thus part “of” it, as they are part of our subjective experience. Another phenomenon complicating our experience of the world is projection, or unconscious attribution of unconscious states to the object. Everything psychic is originally projected and therefore seen on the object, only gradual conscious realization of the source makes this two worlds relatively distinct. According to the theory of Lévy-Bruhl later adapted by Jung, ancient humans, or children, naturally live in the state of participation mystique, or unconscious unity. In that state object and subject overlap and are experienced as one. Hence magical thinking or believe that external beings are directly responsible for one’s mental states. According to Jung, realizations of the unconscious contents, i.e., withdrawals of projections and transforming unconscious to consciousness creates more accurate (real) picture of the world. He termed this individuation. (See Jung, CW 6, par. 781.)”

From our new book:
“In Joshua 10, we find the story of Joshua praying to the Lord to stop the moon and sun to give him extra time to finish fighting the Amorites:
At that time Joshua spoke to the Lord in the day when the Lord gave the Amorites over to the sons of Israel, and he said in the sight of Israel, “Sun, stand still at Gibeon, and moon, in the Valley of Aijalon.” And the sun stood still, and the moon stopped, until the nation took vengeance on their enemies. Is this not written in the Book of Jashar? The sun stopped in the midst of heaven and did not hurry to set for about a whole day. There has been no day like it before or since, when the Lord heeded the voice of a man, for the Lord fought for Israel. So Joshua returned, and all Israel with him, to the camp at Gilgal (Joshua 10:12, English Standard Version).
If the Earth really stopped rotating, the Earth would have to slow from 1,100 miles per hour to a complete stop in less than 24 hours. We know that everything that is not tied down, including people and waters, would continue fly in the direction of the Earth’s rotation at the speed of 1,100 miles per hour at the equator. To take this story literally and concretely, we would have to accede with a miracle of enormous complexity. We would have to accept a God who can operate outside of natural laws. Further, this God would act very arbitrarily in his choice with respect to the person for whom he will do such a favor. This would also have enormous implications for the power and efficaciousness of prayer. Religious scriptures are full of similar miraculous stories. We can take them at their face value and consider them “realities” or accept them as symbolic expressions of something equally important in the realm of psycho-spiritual reality. It can easily be argued that with respect to one’s moral obligations, the symbolic understanding has a firmer bearing because it calls upon one’s responsibility based on insight and understanding of the implications of conduct, while literalism only prescribes maxims for behavior through the reliance on blind faith in the external judger and punisher. Great philosophical questions concerning life after death, freedom of will, and the existence of God are irresolvable mysteries within one frame of reference, but they can be absolute certainties in other frames of reference. The task of consciousness is to preserve the best possible relationship between the rational and irrational, the concrete and abstract, the literal and symbolic. The price for this loss of balance is extremely high; because is real.”

“Just like a child’s secure attachment (which is characterized by ability to safely leave caregiver and come back to him or her for protection) allows for the development of a balanced relationship between dependence and autonomy, so the secure spiritual development is predicated upon the ability of relating objective religious ideas to inner religious persuasions inferred from inner individual experiences and thus a balance between reasonable dependence on Imago Dei and trust to autonomy of one’s own spirituality. “